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Most Common Spotting Error Concept Questions Asked in Every GOVT JOB Exam [SERIES PART 2]

By Basant Singhal|English Grammar Concepts | 28 Dec 2018

Most Common Spotting Error Concept Questions

Asked in Every GOVT JOB Exam

[SERIES PART 2]

 

 

[Most Useful for Banking and SSC GOVT JOB Exams]

 

 

With Answers and Detailed Explanation

 

 

Hi Friends,

This is the 'Part 2' of this series.

 

If you have already read the 'Part 1' of this series, please continue

with the Part 2 here, otherwise go back and first read the Part 1

of this series.

 

Here,

 

I will discuss some more English grammar concepts which

are extremely important for Govt.job aspirants, students and

people in general who want to learn good English and speak

and write better.     

 

 

Here we go...

 

Concept # 3 Sentences Based on ‘Double Question’

 

helping.png

 

What is a Double Question?

 

Well,

 

When a ‘Direct Question’ is written and mixed into another

 

sentence, it becomes a ‘Double Question’.

 

Following are the examples of ‘Direct Questions’.

 

1. Where does he live?   (Single or Direct Question)

2. What is your name?   (Single or Direct Question)

3. How do you do it?  (Single or Direct Question)

 

make thing happen.jpg

 

Following are the examples of ‘Indirect Questions’.

 

1. Can you tell me where he lives? (Double or Indirect Question)

2. I have no idea where he lives.    

 

This is a statement, not a Direct or Indirect Question because

 

here, we are NOT asking any question.

 

Please notice the punctuation mark in the sentence ‘I have no idea where he lives.’ It ends with a ‘full stop’ and not with a question mark.

 

Understood?

 

Now,         

  

Let’s first understand what ‘statement’ is and how it differs from a ‘Question’ and when these two are mixed into a single sentence, how the ‘sentence pattern’ changes. 

 

 

Where does he live?  is a question, right?

How does he learn?  is a question, right?

Why does he do it?  is a question, right?

 

Remember, a question written separately follows a ‘Question

 

Pattern’ i.e. Wh Word + Helping Verb + Sub + V1?

    

 ‘I do not know’ is a statement. To be precise, it is a

 negative statement, right?

 

 

Remember, a statement written separately follows

a Statement Pattern i.e.

 

Sub + Verb + Object in affirmative

 

 

And, 

 

 

Sub + Helping Verb + Not + Verb  + Object in Negative

 

Now, what I want to explain here is that when you write

these two types of sentences separately, they follow their

own separate sentence patterns

 

But,

 

When you write these two types of sentences together,

it becomes a ‘new’ sentence and this ‘new’ sentence follows

a different pattern.

 

For example - 

 

If you write ‘I don’t know’ and ‘where does he live?’

togetherthat is how you have to write it and this is correct. ,

 

I do not know where he lives.

 

 

And not,

 

 

I do not know where does he lives. (This is incorrect)

I do not know where does he live.   is also incorrect.

 

 

 

Why,

 

The concept is…

 

When we write a ‘question’ along with a ‘statement’, we change the ‘question’ into a ‘statement’ and write it as a statement. I mean, we do not follow a ‘question pattern’ but the ‘statement pattern’.

 

I hope, you understand!

 

Now, look at the following incorrect and correct sentences.

 

Incorrect sentences are written in RED while correct

 

sentences are written in GREEN.  

 

SENTENCE # 1

 

1. I have no idea what does he do for the living.

1. I have no idea what he does for the living.

 

learning.jpg

 

SENTENCE # 2

 

2. I want to know why did he do it.

2. I want to know why he did it.

 

SENTENCE # 3

 

3. Please tell me where do you go in the morning and what

kind of exercises do you like.

3. Please tell me where you go in the morning and what

kind of exercises you like.

 

Please note when the question is of the

 

‘What+ is/ are/ am’ or ‘Who + is/ are/ am

 

and there is no ‘Noun’ to link with ‘Who’ or ‘What’,

the Direct and Indirect Questions look the same.

 

See the correct example sentences below -

 

grow fast.jpg

 

 

SENTENCE # 4

 

4. What is shown in this beautiful picture?

4. I know what is shown in this beautiful picture.

4. I do not know what is shown in this beautiful picture.

4. Can you tell me what is shown in this beautiful picture?

 

 

Some more examples for you...

 

 

SENTENCE # 5

5. Who was sleeping in the hall?  (A question)

5. I can easily guess who was sleeping in the hall. (A statement)

5. Do you have any idea who was sleeping in the hall? (A question)  

 

 

But,

 

When the question is of the

 

‘What+ is/ are/ am’ or ‘Who + is/ are/ am

and there is another ‘Noun’ to link with ‘Who’ or ‘What’,

the Direct and Indirect Questions Do Not look the same.

 

See the examples below - 

 

studddd.jpg

 

 

SENTENCE # 6

 

6. What was that noise in the ground? 

(A question) 'noise' is a noun here.

 

6. I wonder what that noise was in the ground.

(A statement) we have correctly put ‘noise’ (noun)

before the helping verb ‘was’ here. 

 

6. Can you guess what that noise was in the ground?

(A double question)  

 

Look at the following example

 

 

SENTENCE # 8

 

 

7. Have you decided yet where are you going on holiday?

7. Have you decided yet where you are going on holiday?

 

Now, the tricky one,

 

 

SENTENCE # 9

 

8. Can you please tell me, in the easiest language, what are

 

8. the two most important options, I should look for in this.

 

This is acceptable.

 

 

 

Because,

 

 

The Subject Phrase ‘the two most important options I should look for in this’ is too long and, it also takes the ‘are’ far too away from the ‘Wh-word’.

 

If there are fewer words in the subject, normal word

order should be used.

 

 

For example - 

 

SENTENCE # 10

 

 

9. I don’t know what are the options.  (An incorrect statement)

9. I don’t know what the options are.  (A correct statement)

 

Another tricky question - 

 

 

SENTENCE # 11

 

 

10. The devil lies in the details on how much respite does India

 

and seven others have got from the US to import Iranian oil.

 

10. The devil lies in the details on how much respite India

and seven others have got from the US to import Iranian oil

 

 

SENTENCE # 12

 

 

11. They all were curious to know how did the sheep

jump over the fence.

11. They all were curious to know how the sheep

jumped over the fence.

 

 

12. His father was angry with him and wanted to know

where did he go last night and what did he do there.

12. His father was angry with him and wanted to know

where he went last night and what he did there.

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That's it in this series part 2!

I will see you in the next part.

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Call and WhatsApp -  9893719933 | 7999407074

basantsinghal2210@gmail.com

 

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